If you think someone you know has been discriminated against, there are lots of ways in which you can help them.

Understanding the behaviours associated with discrimination is a good place to start. Most people will be able to describe what has happened, or is happening, to them and how it's making them feel.

Unlawful discrimination takes place when an individual or a group of people are treated less favourably than others based on a protected characteristic such as age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership (in employment), pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief (including lack of belief), gender and sexual orientation.

Discrimination is contrary to the Equality Act 2010, the Student Dignity and Respect Policy and the University Equality, Diversity and Inclusion strategy.

Think

Talk

  • Listen. Just taking the time to listen to someone and talk about what has happened can help. These six active listening tips might help you support them.
  • Give options. When they have finished talking ask them if they are okay to talk through some possible options and next steps.
  • To a Wellbeing Advisor. In addition to providing wellbeing support for a range of issues that affect students, a Wellbeing advisor can talk through how to make a complaint and what support is available, in confidence.
  • To Human Resources who can provide advice, guidance and signposting for staff.
  • UCLan Students' Union Advice and Representation Centre. This is a free, confidential, impartial service where students can get advice and information on academic and personal issues, including advice on procedures and representation at hearings. The Advice and Representation Centre is also a third party Hate Crime reporting centre.
  • The UCLan Mediation Clinic offers an alternative dispute resolution approach.It is confidential and can help resolve a disagreement or conflict, with a colleague in the work place or a fellow student. It offers mediation for students and staff and is a tool used to deal with conflict and disagreements. The session is facilitated by an impartial mediator who will help the parties to resolve the conflict. All parties have to be willing to take part and can leave the process at any time.

Report

  • Report and Support Students and staff can report an incident using the University’s Report and Support system. They can choose to do this anonymously or they can request support from an advisor. If they choose to talk to an advisor they will be able to talk through the options and support available, in confidence.
  • University Procedure If they choose to make a formal complaint to the University against a student or a member of staff there are procedures which set out the steps they’ll need to follow.

Get Support

Mental Health and Wellbeing

1 in 4 people is affected by a mental health problem in any year and it is estimated that around 1 in 5 people has contemplated suicide or self-harm. Experiencing discrimination can have detrimental effect on a person’s mental wellbeing. If you are worried or concerned about the impact on someone’s mental wellbeing, find out more about how you can help them.

Take care of yourself.

It’s important that you take care of yourself. If you’ve heard something distressing or if something is troubling you, the University's Student Wellbeing Service offers confidential help to students. If you are a member of staff, you can email the Staff Counselling service to request an appointment.

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There are two ways you can report something